Wednesday, September 8, 2010

Where is Osama El-Baz ??

Again I am asking where is Osama El-Baz ?? Where has he gone !!?? Is he still really among Mubarak’s advisers !!??

It was said that he left his position or rather had to leave it because he clashed with Gamal Mubarak and his team.

El-Baz unlike Mustafa El-Faky is more respected and more balanced even when it comes to the international and regional policies. It is noticed that El-Baz has not been featured in the mainstream media for a long time now.

The only time El-Baz is seen in it in public is at the metro stations, yes he takes the metro without any bodyguards like any ordinary citizen.

Dr. Osama El-Baz in Cairo underground
Osama El-Baz in the metro

Dr. El-Baz was from the names in the regime that we can have a dialogue with and how he was ousted will show you that how Gamal Mubarak and his men refuse to hear or to reconsider any opinion except their own opinions.

According to some sources Gamal Mubarak’s men want to get rid from Omar Soliman in the same but they could not due to his position and his strong friendship with Mubarak , if this is true than these posters which were removed may be are made by them in an attempt to create a crack between Mubarak , the father and Soliman.

15 comments:

  1. Sudanese Observer9/08/2010 01:20:00 PM

    El-Baz unlike Mustafa El-Faky is more respected and more balanced even when it comes to the international and regional policies.

    Very true.

    El-Baz did not make incendiary and dismissive comments that are insulting to Sudan and the Sudanese (even though relations were worse at the end of his tenure) - in the same way El-Faky did - with regards to the Halayeb triangle which is illegally militarily occupied by Egyptian forces.

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  2. FYI El-Baz believes Halayeb is Egyptian but as I said he is more balanced and knows when to speak "he barely does in the media"

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  3. i dont think that gamal mubarak's team will be able to make a clash between mubarak and soliman .. they really have a strong friendship i mean he even called his grandson after him ..

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  4. Sudanese Observer9/08/2010 03:40:00 PM

    Zeinobia you overstate the obvious.

    Of course, as a senior member of the Egyptian executive, he would believe that the illegal military occupation of Halayeb is right - otherwise he wouldn't be in that government position.

    I stated that El-Faky made incendiary and dismissive comments that are insulting to Sudan and the Sudanese and this stands true.

    And refusing international arbitration over Halayeb in the same way that Egypt resorted to international arbitration with *Israel* over Taba is unconscionable.

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  5. last time i saw him was in Semiramis InterContinental, he takes his coffee everyday in Cafe Corniche there and he comes alone, he allows you to check him for metals if u don't know him, he comes in silence and leaves in silence he is a very respected man

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  6. يا زينب
    مش معقول في كل مناسبة ومن غير مناسبة نلاقي
    الأخ السوداني بيتكلم علي حلايب
    لو عايز يعمل blog
    لنفسه و يخلصنا من الدوشة

    Egyptian in USA

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  7. Sudanese Observer9/08/2010 11:18:00 PM

    الدوشة المزعومة باقية بقاء كل الغايات الصادقة و
    سنعلق على كل ما يمس شعب السودان من قرب أو بعد
    و ان كان صدركم لا يسع الآراء المخالفة فلا يستغرب أن تكون الديمقراطية غايتكم و ليس واقعكم على مدى أكثر من نصف قرن

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  8. @Sudanese Observer: dah 3ala assan eno 3andokom democracy :D

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  9. Sudanese Observer9/09/2010 01:32:00 PM

    @ Anonymous - 3 different civilian democratic periods of governance - the most glorious of which was at the onset of independence from the political ties imposed by Muhammad Ali by force in 1820 and then buttressed by the British with Egyptian window dressing in 1899.

    Do some reading - it might take you a long way ; )

    I recommend 'The Sudan Republic' by Holt and Daly and The Interim Constitution 2005

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  10. Sudanese Optimist9/09/2010 01:37:00 PM

    3 Presidents since 1952 each serving to their last breath...

    Emergency laws for over 20 years...

    No tangible, working opposition...

    No real separation of constitutional powers...

    You even named your opposition movement 6th of April, which is the day in which governance was changed in Sudan through a combination of popular uprising and military collusion...


    The tit for tat mentality is very yawn inducing but not at all surprising...

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  11. As opposed to Egypt's experience Sudan has chosen its political leadership freely and fairly and in an environment of political pluralism three times since 1956 - the last of which was in 1986.

    The most glorious democratic manifestation in Sudan was at independence when we decided to sever misguided political ties with Egypt that were imposed by Muhmmad Ali by force in 1820 and then buttressed by the British, with Egyptian window-dressing in 1899.

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  12. @The 2 sudanese: stop diverting every topic into Sudan. You said your thoughts and repeated them over and over and over again. Its so disrespectful of you to keep on deviating from original posting topics. As someone wrote, make your own blog and be respectful to this blog and its followers.

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  13. Sudanese Observer9/09/2010 06:21:00 PM

    @ Anonymous - scroll up and *read*

    The initial comment was not divergent from the topic - on the contrary it backed the post's assumption that El-Baz is is
    "more respected and more balanced even when it comes to the international and regional policies."

    And the example of the statements of both men on 'Sudan' were made.

    I find it highly ironic when you speak of 'respect' and 'disrespect' - two notions you disregard and are selective with when dealing with 'the other'.

    Consider our views here as an exercise for all you democracy campaigners.

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  14. @Sudanese Observer: We all respected ur repeated opinions, some replied and you replied back. The OP has nothing to do with Sudan, you are the one who keeps on throwing Sudan in any topic to get to say your repeated words. Im not the only reader here who wrote about this way of deviating from the OPs. Again, if you have so much to say and so frequent, have our own blog and leave it up to ppl to check it or not.

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  15. Sudanese Observer9/11/2010 06:33:00 AM

    Anonymous:

    What part of:

    @ Anonymous - scroll up and *read*

    The initial comment was not divergent from the topic - on the contrary it backed the post's assumption that El-Baz is is
    "more respected and more balanced even when it comes to the international and regional policies."

    And the example of the statements of both men on 'Sudan' were made.

    Do you not understand???

    'We' are taking bets on whether Zeinobia will ever write about the Sudanese civil society activists from Halayeb who are detained without trial by Egyptian security forces - in the same way she writes about Palestinians, Syrians and Egyptians who are similarly unlawfully detained.

    Anything that has to do with Egypt's African foreign policy, the Nile (or how Egypt uses its inequitable 55.5 billion cubic metres), Halayeb, Muhammad Ali and his dynasty - and any racist depictions of black Africa in the Egyptian media relates to the Sudanese people.

    Or do you just memorise the proposition that 'Sudan is Egypt's strategic depth', 'Sudan is a national security issue for Egypt' and the stomach churning 'Egypt and Sudan have a common destiny' - without ever thinking of what this entails?

    Get used to reading, hearing, considering - even maybe 'accepting' peoples' differing opinions - it's a healthy part of democracy.

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