Egyptian Chronicles: A slap that restored to the Arabs their dignity

Sunday, March 27, 2011

A slap that restored to the Arabs their dignity

Cherchez La Femme in the Arab revolution Tsunami and here I am not speaking Laila Ben Ali and Suzanne Mubarak played a dangerous role in the end of their husbands’ presidential career with no doubt
The Ben Alis and the Mubaraks in 2002
I am speaking about that policewoman who slapped and spat a simple vegetables street vendor without knowing that that slap would awake the dignity of not less 100 million Arab from the Gulf to ocean. No one would have imagined that this slap would result in changing geopolitics of a whole region like that bringing down regimes that stayed for decades and decades !!
policewoman Fadia Hamdi 
Here are the countries which witnessed protests because of political , Social and economic reasons : Tunisia , Egypt , Algeria , Yemen , Libya , Bahrain, Oman, Saudi Arabia, Morocco , Syria , Jordan and Mauritania  without any order just in 4 months !!
May Allah bless the soul of Mohamed Bou Azizi , you taught us that a very important lesson in the Arab world : History is made by simple people sometimes , most of the time actually not by presidents who believe themselves as false idols. God bless you simple man.
God forgive you Fadia for your rudeness and arrogance.
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7 comments :

  1. The Tim Berners-Lee Freedom Award 2011
    The nominations so far are:
    Mohamed Bouazizi.

    ReplyDelete
  2. I'd stress that it has not restored the dignity until justice is done. Justice and dignity are closely linked. Without justice you cannot restore dignity.

    Justice needs to be done accurately. Whether it was head of regimes, highest member of security systems, and even low ranking officers. Everyone who have taken part in torturing and killing should be brought to justice.

    Unfortunately progress of doing justice in Egypt seems painstakingly slow, so I have to say that dignity of Egyptians is not yet restored but I'm hopeful.

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  3. Wonder how she and her family must feel now... Ashamed? Assuming that it was the hand (no wordplay) of fate?

    ReplyDelete
  4. Despite my tremendous admiration for the courage of the protestors across the Arab world, I think it simplifies what's happening to suggest that it began with a slap. It began long before that. Let's not forget the courage of those who preceded Mohamed Bou Azizi.

    ReplyDelete
  5. Eric,
    there is only one drop that makes the water in a glass splash all around it. Of course there were people before the slap. But that slap was too much for Mohamed Bou Azizi and his dignity. He was the next drop because he kill himself. That was the spark that went wild. I doubt that without the slap and without Mohamed that millions will have join forces to change things.

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  6. As usual, talk, talk and talk,Slap this, slap that, dignity this, dignity that, liberty, justice blah blah blah.Empty words as usual. How the revolutions in Tunisia and Egypt started and who started it are old news now and progress is too slow...as usual... meanwhile Egypt and Tunisia are now in suspended animation directed by the Armies of course. The important news however is that Lybian oil just like the Iraqi one, is soon to be exported by the so called pro-democracy camp in the east who were helped by Nato, whilst the west of Libya is isolated, suggesting a pre-emptive geographic, economic and social division in Lybia as in the Sudan and Iraq, which guess what? will remain. Mmmm.. that took place in Iraq did it not with the Kurds in the north? Please people put the two together and wize up, democracy will never survive in the Arab world, not if the elite and others are planning its future behind the scenes, yet emotionally charged ordinary Arabs are still talking about justice, dignity, who slapped who yet waiting, waiting and waiting, as usual.

    ReplyDelete

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