Egyptian Chronicles: #Tunisia : A great day not only for Tunisia but for the Arab world

Tuesday, December 13, 2011

#Tunisia : A great day not only for Tunisia but for the Arab world

Today Tunisia has had a new president , its 4th elected president Moncef Marzouki and first one after the revolution. Marzouki has sworn in today in front of the constitutional council.
Please watch Marzouki while he was addressing the council and the public in a historical amazing speech.
Tunis : Marzouki’s speech after swearing in
Here are highlights of what President Marzouki :
  • President Marzouki says that the upcoming constitution will persevere the rights of all Tunisians.
  • President Marzouki promised to protect veiled and non veiled ladies in Tunisia.
    • President Marzouki prayed for Syria , Yemen and Palestine’s liberation from domestic and foreign occupation.
    • President Marzouki cried when he mentioned the martyrs and wounded of the Tunisian revolution.
    • President Marzouki announced that he resigned from his party “CPR” as he become a president for the country.
    • It is not vengance period in Tunisia
    There is no doubt that Marzouki has raised the bar for all the Arab presidents and kings starting with Egypt.
    Here is a shot showing Rashid Amar saluting the new president of Tunisia , of course you can imagine the level of comments from Egypt and the comparison between the Egyptian army and Tunisian army.

    Field Marshal Tantawy has sent a telegram to congratulate President Marzouki today.
    Here is a moment when President Marzouki enters the Carthage palace.
    Tunis : Marzouki arrives to Carthage palace
    I can’t believe that from less than a year I was blogging about Tunisian revolution !!
    By the way contrary to what it is being said , Marzouki divorced his French wife from ten years ago. He is also the first president from human rights activism background as well a blogger.
    Now strangely there was an opposition against Marzouki mainly as he was not elected directly by the people but by constitutional council.
    I am happy for Tunisia and little jealous despite I know when it comes to democratic transition and reforms Egypt is indeed not Tunisia thanks to huge difference between both countries. I think many Arabs envy Tunisia today.
    Still knowing the circumstances of every Arab country , I believe Tunisia was the fastest in reforms thanks to the high education level and the bitter fact that Tunisia compared to Egypt , Syria and Yemen as well Bahrain has not got all these international and regional powers affiliations and deep rooted corruption.


    1. Your blog is superb

    2. And the lesson is: Never involve the army in politics!

    3. I am not impressed by the outcome of the revolution in Tunisia. According to the reports I read, the provisional constitution provides that the president must be Muslim, born in Tunisia from parents born in Tunisia.

      How would you react if a Western country were to provide that the leader of the country must be christian, and exclude first and second generation immigrants from the presidency ? There would be an uproar at the OIC and the UN over such a blatantly discrininatory constitution.

      What if the égyptian constitution were to exclude all Copts from the presidency ?

    4. I am half-Tunisian & half-Egyptian and it is a strange feeling to be so happy for Tunisia and in the same time so angry at the SCAF for the situation in Egypt. For knowing well the country of my father (Egypt) and of my mother (Tunisia), it is clear to me that the situations are very different and by far more complicated in Egypt (I wouldnt say that in the past Tunisians were suffering less than Egyptians, it was more or less the same the same vioence within the dictatorship, the only difference is that in Egypt the mechanism of the oppressive system is far more complicated in nature, so much more complicated to undo)

      PS: For the person who said here about the president of Tunisia requested to be Muslim, I would just answer that its not the same case than Egypt, Copts are a substantial part of Egyptian population (more than 10%) so excluding them is apartheid, while in Tunisia 99.99% of the people are muslim, so practically its excluding no one.


    Thank You for your comment
    Please keep it civilized here , I will not tolerate any insult in my blog or any racist or hateful comment
    The Comments in this blog with exclusion of the blog's owner do not represent the views of the blog's owner

    By Year , By Month