Tuesday, January 4, 2011

Another Pahlavi To Commit Suicide

Alireza in 1987
Earlier today the Pahlavi royal family announced in their official website that Alireza Pahlavi , the younger son of the late Shah from his third wife Farah Diba has committed suicide in his home in Boston. It is worth to mention that his sister Laila also committed suicide in 2001 !!
I have the feelings that the Pahlavis , especially the young ones have some issues and it is not about losing their home and their dad like their mother says !! I feel that their problem is that their mother and elder brother are insisting in living the illusion that they will return back to Iran as the Shah and his family again !! May be their problem was how to live a normal life again , to become a commoner !! I just can’t understand how two siblings from a family like that to kill themselves !! Of course we will know why he killed himself after the autopsy.



Late Laila and Alireza on the right of their late father 
The Pahlavis are much luckier than the daughters of King Farouk who really suffered in their lives in a way we can’t imagine for Egypt and Sudan’s king yet they stood against life amazingly , just look to sweet late Princess Ferial  and how she suffered !!
The Princeton graduate was living alone despite he was engaged from couple of years ago to some girl from the Iranian community in the States.
2 years old prince Alireza between his elder brother and mother
The Palhavis’ statement is very strange because it does not include the name of his eldest sister Shahinaz Palhavi !!
Reza Pahlavi, Farah Pahlavi, Farahnaz Pahlavi, Yasmine Pahlavi, Noor Pahlavi, Iman Pahlavi and Farah Pahlavi
Where is Princess Shahinaz !!?? I just hope she is fine along with beautiful Princess Fawzi may Allah bless her.
Anyhow back to Alireza, the late prince studied for year in the American college in Cairo in 1980.
Allah bless his soul and bring patience for Empress Farah , this can really break her down !! Second kid in 9 years , this is actually worse than any revolution.

16 comments:

  1. could be that there is a tendency in the family to get depressed ect.

    ReplyDelete
  2. may be but what would make them depressed to that level !!?

    ReplyDelete
  3. @ Z: dnt get ur question. It cld be genetic thats what I meant. Ppl get depressed for so many reasons and what can cause a person to get depressed to such an extent as to take ones life, might not be as severe to another person. It all depends on the cooping mechanism each person has and how that person deals with what he/she perceives as sources of unhappiness. You do know that many studies refer to high levels of anxiety and depression in several countries, its the disease of modern life my dear.

    ReplyDelete
  4. I mean you do not get depressed for no reason according to my knowledge except if you have a bipolar disorder http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bipolar_disorder
    which by the way could be the case of the Pahlavis
    Of course we do not know what both of them suffered or saw in their lives but may be i feel that they are too young to die or they should not die like that
    When I gave example for Princess Ferial , I meant it because when I feel sad or depressed for anything I remember how survived life with all hardships and madness with beautiful smile with no grudge.

    ReplyDelete
  5. Sudanese Observer1/05/2011 01:06:00 AM

    Who refers to any of Muhammad Ali's descendants of being Sovereigns of Sudan, apart from someone living in a parallel universe?

    Even Egyptian specialists recognise the fact that Britain was the true sovereign and the one who pulled the strings in Sudan after the reconquest in 1899.

    No Indians refer to Queen Victoria as the Empress of India and no Americans refer to George III as the King of America and no Kuwaitis refer to Saddam Hussein as the President of Kuwait just as no Iraqis refer to Pal Bremmer as Iraq's soveriegn!

    Egyptian delusions of grandeur by some seem to be strong enough to bend history.

    An example is how the 'true' biography of Ismail the son Muhammad Ali is distorted at the citadel's museum where the death of Ismail at the hands of the popularly feted (in Sudan) Mek Nimir - leader of the Ja'liyeen tribe who burned Ismail and his troops after they insulted the tribe - are not made known to the public...

    He and his troops were subsequently buried in a respectable manner - with a dome, in the Sudanese style, by another Sudanese tribal leader in the Eastern Nile region in Khartoum State - which is more than I can say for the fate of those murdered and brutalised at Mustafa Mahmoud, or Halayeb's Sudanese civil society activists...

    Let the dead rest in peace but let it be known that Muhammad Ali and his progeny are reviled by the Sudanese for their illegal, immoral, alien invasion and domination.

    ReplyDelete
  6. illegal, immoral, alien invasion????? how do you define "NORMAL" invasion? and which fictional Ismail Pasha are you rambling about? Farouk was the king of Egypt and Sudan, loved by some and hated by some in both regions. I would'nt suggest that you try to get your facts straight because you are a hopeless case, s.h.!

    ReplyDelete
  7. @ ya Z: i dnt think doctors have come up w a clear explanation for wt makes ppl get depressed and take their lives. I can only imagine that it cant be easy for them living a life that was not realistic. Not all former monarchs wld choose to live in the past or at least get eaten up by it. In all cases, my God protect us all from feeling so helpless as to try and take our lives and may God forgive him.

    ReplyDelete
  8. I can think of one reason to make people depressed enough to take their own lives
    http://frontpagemag.com/wp-content/uploads/2010/07/hosni-mubarak.jpg

    actually 2 reasons

    ReplyDelete
  9. Sudanese Observer1/05/2011 09:10:00 PM

    Alien invasion, colonial domination are legal terms employed in Public International Law.

    Muhammad Ali's son Ismail who led the accursed Sudan expedition in 1820 was assassinated along with a battalion of his troops by the Mekk Nimir, the leader of the Ja'liyeen tribe who is much feted in Sudanese folklore and even has a newly built bridge over the Blue Nile named after him.

    Like I said delusions of patriotic grandeur will cause some to even pervert history - and that is why you probably haven't heard of this event - but it is true.

    Farouk the kleptomaniac puppet was universally reviled by the Sudanese.

    He meant nothing to the Sudanese people and did nothing for them.

    I reiterate:
    No Indians refer to Queen Victoria as the Empress of India and no Americans refer to George III as the King of America and no Kuwaitis refer to Saddam Hussein as the President of Kuwait just as no Iraqis refer to Paul Bremmer as Iraq's soveriegn!

    He is not even a footnote in our history, from our perspective.

    Muhammad Ali is - he is the original tyrant, the occupier but by the time Farouk took Egypt's throne, in the words of the late great Imam AbdelRahman Al-Mahdi - Egypt was the horse on whose back the British regent settled on Sudan's land.

    Now which facts were you contesting?

    ReplyDelete
  10. Just because Leila and Alireza were royalty does not mean that they can't suffer from depression. All the money, power and fame in the world cannot save you if you suffer from a mental illness. As for your question, "What would make a person depressed to that degree?" A lot of things. Genetics, a chemical imbalance, life situations. Your idea that Alireza and Leila had no reason to to be depressed is beyond naive. Leila had been treated for anorexia/bulemia/addiction and depression for years before her suicide. From my research, the Shah himself suffered from depression and it's more than likely that this was a genetic trait in the Pahlavis. Add to that the fact that both Alireza and Leila were both very young when their country saw a revolution, they were exiled and their father died all within months. These are not events that a child can just get over. My thoughts are with the Empress Farah, who is a pillar of strength and courage.

    ReplyDelete
  11. Plz stop feeding the Sudanese trolls. Mohamed Ali and Farouk have been dead for so long yet the Sudanese are loosing their country bec of their own doing. Stop blaming others for your shit, its clear u cant hold ur country together.

    ReplyDelete
  12. It's not a matter of blame - it's a matter of history - the Koreans and the Japanese have the same issues except for the fact that it's only a minority of hardliners who champion Japan's atrocious occupation of Korea...

    We can't hold our country together?
    You haven't spent decades fighting and lost 2 million people doing so.
    It is never possible to 'force' people who don't want to live together to do so.
    Read up on the history of the Southern Sudanese struggle - educate yourself so that any opinion you hold can have some validity beyond stereotypical Egyptian 'slogans' and narrow perspectives looking out for Egypt's interests from a backward and monolithic perspective.

    ReplyDelete
  13. I try to resist my first instinct of grief by reminding myself that suicide is a liberating act. The courage to commit it should be applauded: http://andreasmoser.wordpress.com/2010/09/15/world-suicide-prevention-day-on-10-september/

    ReplyDelete
  14. @Zol: Instead of forcing out Al Bashir you guys are splitting up. Instead of removing those old enough to act on the bitterness of the Sudanese-Sudanese struggle and install younger figures who can find a way to gather the nation you are taking wt seems to be the easy road. In this day and age smaller countries try to appear bigger by regional ties not splitting, Africa has seen enough splits that brought more blood and more poverty and we do not need another split of wt used to be one based on race, tribes and religion.

    ReplyDelete
  15. I don't like Bashir, the opposition don't like him, but unfortunately many, many, many Sudanese do...

    For the millionth time the impending secession of South Sudan is the fruit of a seed that was planted in 1955 prior to independence from Britain...

    Over-simplifying the matter into the unpalatable persona of Sudan's current President is both pedestrian and superficial.

    It's interesting that you speak of 'Africa' now...

    Age is immaterial to the intra-Sudanese conflict - many of the SPLM's rank and file, and that of the ruling NCP, and that of Darfur's rebel groups are young.

    'we do not need another split of wt used to be one based on race, tribes and religion.'

    Precisely, if what used to be 'one' was erroneously re-constructed to champion one race or language or political line (Arabism) over the pluralistic reality of the country - problems start to occur - and they did since 1955...

    The Soviet Union split without blood or poverty, as did the Former Czechoslovakia.
    Both The Czech Republic and Slovakia subsequently became members of the European Union which is a coming together after their break-up.

    The Senegambian Confederation 82-89 was dissolved without bloodshed and poverty as was your own country's with Syria which you do not even share a border with.

    Things occur in shades of grey not black and white.

    ReplyDelete
  16. you cannot point to the political situation in sudan now and get to the notion that m. ali was the sovereign of sudan. the fact is that, he was an invader. you may call him, forced sovereign or imposed leader of sudan, but unless he was accepted by sudanese , he cannot be givven grandeur on their behalf. If this is not the case, then i would be happy to consider egypt today as an evolved product of the persian satrap of misr, a gift to the modern world from the beloved liberator and sovereign , Cambysese (kambujie). i must agree with zol here and applaud him for rationality.

    ReplyDelete

Thank You for your comment
Please keep it civilized here , I will not tolerate any insult in my blog or any racist or hateful comment
The Comments in this blog with exclusion of the blog's owner do not represent the views of the blog's owner